Victor I. Moraru Memorial Fund

Est. 2020 by Ioana Barac and Dr. Ion I. Moraru.

This fund was made possible through the collective generosity of family and friends of Victor and his parents Ioana Barac and Dr. Ion I. Moraru.

Victor’s complex personality drew roots from two different cultures: the Romanian one, inherited from us, his parents, and his native one, American. On both sides of the ocean he will be remembered for his brilliant mind, his free spirit, unapologetic humor, and his capacity for unconditional love.

Victor had an inborn restlessness and yearning for comprehending the universe and his place in it which led him to constantly search for excitement and meaning in multiple ways. In middle school he was an avid reader of history and fantasy, played the trumpet in the Honor Band and Jazz Band, and fell in love with Spanish, earning induction in the Spanish Honor Society; in High School he enjoyed college-level business classes, the People’s Court and the Broadcasting Club; at UConn he pursued his interests in anthropology and marine sciences. He practiced karate, soccer and e-games, relished in comedy and philosophy, hiking and sailing, and was a passionate listener of music, delighting in Bach as much as in Rap and Reggae.

Funny, bright and opinionated, Victor lived and loved on his own terms. He unabashedly chose public school over private school and invested only in the subjects and activities that interested him. He valued spiritual and emotional honesty and disdained labels and judgments.

He loved the world with its civilizations, mountains and oceans. But first and foremost, Victor cherished connection. He occasioned long, passionate conversations, and found great meaning in being with his young and old friends in times of fun and in times of need. He built deep, lasting bonds with highly diverse groups and individuals and was their common ground and meeting place. Open to people and experiences, he discovered the undeniable impact of economic hardship, mental health issues, and discrimination on those around him.

Victor lived in the moment and struggled with planning for the future – always weary of ”joining the rat race” – but he had big dreams of sailing the world, building wealth and coming home to support his hometown’s schools and communities.